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annual conference on science, policy, and the environment, disasters in the environment. i'm the executive director of a national council of the science of the environment, and it is my distinct master of ceremonies for much of the conference. thank you for coming. lots of people are still outside, encourage them to come in and settle themselves down. super storm sandy, drought on agriculture, wildfires, the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear reactor accident in japan last year, haiti earthquake, the list is long and worrying. in 20 # 11, we had more disasters in the united states costing more than a billion dollars than ever. in fact, we had more expensive disasters, but not quite as many in 2012. the drought and the super storm were hugely, hugely expensive. disasters are happening with greater frequency, greater severity, and absolutely with many, many greater costs. we ray -- we are here over the next three days to work across traditional boundaries to connect scientists of all stripes with practitioners, with policymakers from the international to the local level with co
. apologies to matt damon, we ran out of time. tomorrow night, mark wahlberg, jennifer lopez and science bob. thanks for watching. stay up for "nightline." good night. >>> tonight on "nightline," she's charged with shooting, stabbing, and slashing her one-time boyfriend. tonight, the explosive recordings exposing her changing story and her web of lies. >>> hot, sweaty, and under fire. he claims he can help you live longer and improve your sex life. the millionaire guru and the accusation shaking his hot yoga empire. >>> secret brazil. we journeyed to the hidden corners of south america for close encounters with nature's noble and not so noble beasts. >>> from new york city, this is "nightline" with cynthia mcfadden. >> good evening, and thanks for joining us. tonight, we begin with a shocking story of love gone deadly wrong. the latest twist in the murder trial of 32-year-old woman charged with shooting, stabbing, and slashing her one-time boyfriend. well, she's admitted to police that she did indeed kill him. she's claiming it was self-defense. but today, explosive new tapes reminded the ju
co-author who is professor of political science at harvard. many years ago when we repose at princeton university, we co-taught a course at the public policy and that led to his co-authored several books on deliberation and democracy. >> host: in the spirit of compromise, you get to vegetative examples. 1986 tax reform health care act. if you work, walk us through this. >> guest: this is a tale of two compromises and begins with ronald reagan presidency, where tax reform was a hugely important issue and hugely difficult issue to get done between republicans and democrats. those of us who lived through the reagan era's recognize that people thought they were very polarized. tip o'neill was a staunch liberal democrat. ronald reagan's staunch republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise with bradley dan rostenkowski bob packwood being part of the movers of this compromise. password to the affordable care act. it is arguably even more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party because of the permanent campaign and how not just polarized, bu
to rebuild it that way. this is the last part, from the science perspective. here's my ask. who's making the decisions about where we build, how we build? and if in a summit with the united states you're going to think it's the federal government. no. some of you might think it's the state government. not really. where do these decisions get made? local officials. whether their city or county commissions, land-use planning board. this is where the decisions are made every day wear, added up, the risk exposure occurs, but on a day-to-day translational basis you probably don't see this. but this is where decisions are made about where we build, how we build, types of building codes were going to enforce. right? yet many of these officials under tremendous pressure, particularly on the downturn that generate revenue how well the generate revenue? jobs and growth. have you ever seen anybody running for office thing i want our community to get smaller? it's always jobs and growth. that's like a mantra. that's how we go tax bases. they're having to make decisions that oftentimes our short-term
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. and they have six grams of sugars. with fifteen grams of protein to help manage hunger... look who's getting smart about her weight. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. >>> hey, there, here's what's happening. algeria news anyonen si says an attempt to free hostages is over. it's unclear how many hostages were killed in the op raegs. boeing plans to keep producing 787 dream liners, even though the planes remain grounded by the f.a.a. due to concerns about their lithium batteries. and pauline phillips has died. she was 94 years old. back to "hardball." ♪ >>> welcome back to "hardball." even before president obama announced the nomination of chuck hagel to be se
learning to bubble in a multiple choice response. it is not literature, science, innovation, or creativity. it is not innovation. we need rigor and imagination. you need both. you have the left hand and the right hand. we have to combine those things. in california, we create innovation by ab32, but the only state with the cap and trade program, we create it by cutting regulation. i had to fire two incumbent people in our division of conservation. there were blocking oil exploration. i fired them and the oil permits for drilling went up 18%. we have to work on many levels. we're promoting efficiency. we're promoting and renewable energy and climate change -- i take courage change very seriously. we have got to do with it and there is a lot of resistance. but we deal with that through enlightened government policies, feedback, and changing them when we find they do not work. and encouraging the private sector where the ideas come up. i do not think -- steve jobs working in his career came up with stuff. i did not know that steve jobs was working in that group on the computer. we want to hav
. this is the neuroscience that we know today, the brain science that we're getting today is irrefutable irrefutable. this is a disease that centers in the brain. people can't deny it. tip o'neill, they didn't have the science back then. >> what happens when you have family members, four or five family members, and they all grow up the same way with the same parents and only one gets hit by it? how do you explain that? >> it's a tricky illness. there's one gene in your body that determines whether you're actose intolerant. there's 20 genes that they've identified that have something to do with the way alcohol is metabolized in your body. we just don't know. you can't ignore the complex interplay between biology and environment when it comes to this illness. >> what about the ethnic factor? we always talk about the irish or the native american indians. is it lack of tolerance? what's the terms? is there a term for it? is there legacy? >> no, no, no. there's a genetic factor and there's an environmental factor. but the bottom line is we know how to deal with this. prevention, prevention, preen. nine o
and education and job training and science and medical research -- all the things that help us grow. now, step by step, we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago, i signed into law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that we'll save in interest payments on the debt, all together that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the past two years -- not counting the $400 billion already saved from winding down the wars in iraq and afghanistan. so we've made progress. we are moving towards our ultimate goal of getting to a $4 trillion reduction. and there will be more deficit reduction when congress decides what to do about the $1.2 trillion in automatic spending cuts that have been pushed off until next month. the fact is, though, we can't finish the job of deficit reduction through spending cuts alone. the cuts we've already made to priorities other than medicare, medicaid, social s
. this is the neuroscience that we know today, the brain science that we're getting today is irrefutable. this is a disease that centers in the brain. tip o'neil, they didn't have the science back then. >> what if only one gets hit by it? >> it's a tricky illness. there's one gene in your body that determines whether you're lactose intolerant. there's 20 genes that identify with the way alcohol is metabolized in your body. you just can't ignore the interplay between biology and environment. >> what about the fact that we talk about the irish or the native american indians. is it a lack of tolerance? is there a term for it? >> no, no, no. there's a genetic factor and an environmental factor. but the bottom line is we know how to deal with this. prevention, prevention, prevention. nine out of ten addicts started when they were teenagers. if the brain is still developing and you hijack it, you're permanently -- >> you don't like these laws legalizing marijuana? >> no, i don't. i think we need the public health community to weigh in here. so we need to be mindful, and not jump into this. >> like joe camel and
that fault zones are dangerous places to live but thanks to science we have increased more than two orders of nag any attitude the safety of living in earthquake country. that fact was demonstrated by the different experiences in death and destruction in haiti where earthquake resilientcy is nonexistent and chile that took its playbook from california. that's why i'm optimistic that science and engineering cals make the coastle zone a safer place to live. there are important differences between the problem of earthquake hazards and coastal hazards. if we put aside those umph bumper stick thears say stop plate tectonics. huges have an effect on the rate -- humans have the an effect on the rate and the intensity of earthquakes. on the other hand, we have increased coastal hazards by increasing the rate of wetland loss anbar yur island erosion and sea level rise. what this means in addressing coastal hazards we need to confront both mother nature and the enhanced risk from impacts. i would argue the philosophy we have to approach this with is exactly the same. scientists can make recommendati
in history and i think people who sort of follow the science of sport realized that is anything but the case but this is a system with a massive, massive number of false negatives and very few false positives and if you are really trying hard and have a lot of resources then you shouldn't fail the test. me and a colleague lena roberts reported last year he also had people in the anti-doping labs helping him figure out how to skip by those tests you should never fail if you have that kind of test. >> i mean, when you look at what he has done, what is is the reaction of his fries, tse people closest to him? >> anybody talk to them? >> well, it is an interesting place, because knows are the people that get forgotten, especially the x friends, i know he reached out to half a dozen people who were harmed the most, this is not a story about lying, as the story about protecting the lie by viciously attacking other people who can't fight back, attacking with lawyers and powers and all means necessary that lance attacks but reached out over the last few days, i think a couple of conversations have ha
and studying political science. this is the fight back we are talking about. please say a quick word about what it is like trying to navigate through poverty when you are a single mom and what you say to all of those single moms watching right now trying to navigate the same journey. >> thank you for having me. it is not easy to be able to come and leave my baby back. i was feeling sad. i did not want to leave him. this is a fight for plenty of women, and not only single mothers. single fathers out there as well that struggle just as much as i do. [applause] i know plenty of them and they struggle. picture this. you are a single parent, but you have to come up with a way how to feed your family, work at the same time to pay bills, and go to school to get an education to better your life. last year, i only made $8,000 the whole year. my food stamps were cut. that was the only way i was able to feed my son, $85 a month. the average spent -- average family spends close to $500 or more. you expect me to spend $85 and live with that for my son. we had to be sent to a shelter because my mother no lon
and deficit reduction. he spoke at the briefing today hosted by the christian science monitor for an hour. >> thanks for coming. i'm dave cook from the monitor. welcome to the first breakfast of the new year. the guest is representative sander levin of michigan cranking member of the house ways and means committee. this is the first visit of the group. he did for deily to detroit native and the university of chicago, master's and international relations of columbia and a law degree from harvard who was elected in the michigan state senate in 1964 and served as a senate minority leader during the carter administration he was assistant administrator of the agency for international development elected to the house in 1982. for four years after his brother carl was elected to the senate. in march, 2010, representative levin one the gavel of the chairman of the ways and means committee. in the biographical portion of the program now on to the thrilling portion. as always we are on the record please, no blogging and tweeting while the breakfast is underway. there is no embargo when the breakfas
is the ranking member on house ways and means committee. is that this is sponsored by the christian science monitor. it is one hour. >> thank you for coming. i am david cote from the monitor. our guest this morning is representative sander levin of. he is a detroit native. he has a masters in international relations from harvard and was elected to the michigan state senate in 1964 and service the senate minority leader. under the current administration he was under the agency for international development and was elected to the house in 1980 to four years after his brother carl was elected to the senate. in march 2010, he won the battle of chairman of the ways and means committee. there is no embargo and breakfast is over except that c-span has agreed not to use video of the sessions session for at least two hours after the represent. to help c-span, if you happen to be sitting there microphone and you ask a question, pullet close to you. if not, they will come around you with a boom microphone. finally, if you send me a signal, i will do my best to answer questions and comments. >> thank
said we do our own nutritional analysis and it's not as bad as what the center for science in the public interest found and they also said our dishes are served in generous portions. perfect for sharing or enjoying later at home. so of course if you eat a quarter of it and bring the rest home, that's a whole different scenario. >> and eat it over the next two or three week. that list of five terms, those are some of my favorite words. >> of course. >> so wondering what i'm going to do. we talk about calorie counts going on the menus. when can we expect that it become a reality? >> obamacare required it. they think it was just about insurance. but obamacare said you have for put it on the menu if you're a big chain and they published thing and it seems to not quite have happened. and so in that case, since it hasn't happened, you have to be an empowered restaurant eater and find out the facts on your own. sosmartphone, there's tons of apps that will tell you the calorie count. so don't wait for the restaurants to tell you. >> all i can say is wow. elizabeth cohen, thanks ver
, you'll get penicillin, penicillin is the key for everyone. science is on bioengineered drugs, et cetera, where, in fact, in the future we will each get a unique drug that is bioengineered for us. how on earth does that old regulatory system move to accommodate the new one? this is extremely difficult and, of course, they are bound by the systems, right, they are bound by their history, as we all are, and this is becoming extreme difficult. in area after area, and, of course, this is, particularly the cutting edge innovative businesses that constantly get frustrated. we can grow, we can get so much bigger, we can bring in so much more money, we could create 74 jobs. and yet, there's a regulatory apparatus is simply not done to deal with the rate of technological change of the 21st century. so i think that would be the second way we could improve performance. the third way would be to take performance seriously. as i say, we have, the government is now up to its ears in performance methods. when i was having to be an advocate for the 20 years ago there was a brand-new idea. i said
political science expert and has done a lot of understanding in terms of venezuela specifically. you know, one of the things we say often in politics, you can't beat something with nothing, right? and so the opposition may have problems with the way things are going forward, but what is the realistic alternative that they have in the current environment and to the extent that they really want to contest this, what can they do to move forward? >> well, first, let me echo what charles said. it is somewhat intimidating to be in the room with a lot of you who know and follow venezuela a lot more closely than i do. so i'm going to quote someone who actually knows venezuela as i do, and that's my 8-year-old son. [laughter] he's been, oddly -- because i've been called at all hours of the day and night checking my equal and computer constantly, he's been very obsessed with the health of chavez. the other day, actually on the 10th in the morning, he says how's that president anyway? i said, well, he's still sick, but he's going to be sworn in absentia as president. and he says why don't they just
guide him, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> ♪ sing hallelujah, come on get happy ♪ . stuart: we're trying to convey positivity here, the dow at a five year high. s&p 500 at a five year high. and remember the dow the 13,596 is the close yesterday and trying to do the math, about 500 points away from the all-time high reached back in october. 2007. cheer up, look at your 401(k) maybe you've made more money than you thought. and the dow industrials opening lower in the opening minutes, seconds, i should say of the trading session this friday. we're down 13 in the early going, still, 13,583. how about one of those door stopper stocks, it's a dow component in the news, general electric, made 4 billion dollars in 13 weeks, it's going to return in dividends over 12 billion dollars to shareholders this year, so, nicole, i expect the stock is up. is that right? >> sure is. it's up about 2%, 2.7%, right now. certainly looking good. 2190 not a bad start. stuart: i keep talking about door
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. come with a little extra help in the kitchen. in a first of its kind partnership with walmart, humana medicare plans now include 5% savings on great for you healthier foods at walmart! it's part of the vitality healthyfood program... and one more way humana medicare can help you choose whatat's good for your health and your wallet. so you can spend a little less money... and spend a little more time sharing what you know with the people who matter most. humana. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: here is your fox business brief. airbus has surrendered its crown as the world's largest plane maker to boeing saying it orders fell by 36% from a record breaking 2011. even still, the company bl
of fascism or communism with muskets or militias. no single person can train the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future. or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores. now, more than ever, we must do these things together, as one nation and one people. [ cheers and applause ] >> this generation of americans has been tested by crises that steeled our resolve and proved our resilience. a decade of war is now ending. [ applause ] >> an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all the qualities that this world without boundaries demands. youth and drive, diversity and openness. an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. my fellow americans, we are made for this moment, and we will seize it so long as we seize it together! [ applause ] >> for we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. [ applause ] >> we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad should
that klaus made, the national academy of sciences shortly will be issuing a report on the nation's energy work force, and the seven or eight sectors across energy are experiencing much higher levels of retirement, much greater shortages in exactly the same skill sets that we found in the entry-level jobs and early jobs in manufacturing. so that competition across sectors for a minimal pool is only going to increase, putting more of a burden on your efforts in the region. but i think it's important to see how this is a growing problem. >> right. >> i was just going to say two quick this things. one is this big data idea that the mayor mentioned and you mentioned, and i think that's where we should just leverage that. that's the capability we have to talk about where these job needs are. we talked about the machinists, right? that is an aging talent, really vital talent pool. so i think getting more transparency because students just -- we aren't aware of what these opportunities are, and we can get that quickly. i really think that's a key element. the second related to that, you mentioned
fascism and communism's with muskets are in no if no single person can train all the math and science teachers for what they will need to quit the children of the future for. or build the road to networks and research labs that will bring new jobs to our shores. now more than ever, we must do these things together. as one nation and one people. [cheers] [applause] this generation of americans has been tested by crises steel our resolve and prove evers-williams. a decade of war has not ended. [cheers] [applause] and economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless. for we possess all the qualities of this world, youth and diversity and openness. unless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. my fellow americans, we are made for this moment and we will seize it so long as we see fit together. [cheers] [applause] we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well in the growing many barely make it. [cheers] [applause] we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know
cannot find the sciences and mathematicians in the u.s. there are family farms that have shut down. others have moved to mexico because they cannot find the workers. the whole economy is suffering because we cannot grow without immigration. we are steering in the face of a potential great stimulus without it costing at trillion dollars. we have also seen the human complexity of immigration intensified. the kids to have been born here to undocumented parents, the kids who came here when there were four or five years old. parents who have worked in a job for 15 years and are hoping this is their future, that they can be part of the american dream. every single day, it becomes more complicated. until lawmakers act, president, the congress, we are allowed in this humanitarian situation to golan. it strikes me as so un american that we ignore it. ignoring the problem does not make the problem go away. there has been a consensus, i believe, that two things are not going to happen. on one hand, we are not going to run the 12 million people and keep them out of the country. -- ralph up 12
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)